Pet Portrait Posing: Ouch

When I have the raw images of a pet, I frequently remove all the extraneous visual noise. Here are three examples of what to consider.

Baby, Daddy and his Bear Dog*
I'm going to take a guess here, but this was probably an attempt at a humorous holiday card. I'm guessing. The doll throws off a different vibe and the sheer size of both the "father" and his animal are distracting enough.
Awkward angle, weird lines and a lawn
Here's a classic top-down angle, with dizzying lines of shadow, a sidewalk crack and part of a lawn. While the dog is front and center (another boring position), it looks like he's uncomfortable.


Where to start...
Visually speaking every piece of visual element in this picture is competing against every visual element in this picture. I'm guessing the artificial flowers are a camouflage and the picket fence is for texture. And, I'm guessing here, again, but given the roundness of the humans, the roundness of the rabbits and the flowers, the picket fence is a welcome relief?

Keep it simple. You'll notice that very few of the portraits I've done have anything resembling an object surrounding the pet. The focus of the portrait is the pet.



JRGlasoe’s pet portrait technique captures what you value and feel about your pet.  He does this by allowing your pet to be themselves.

As a result, the portrait reflects a very unique pet.

To have your pet's portrait - and unique personality - made real, contact

JRGlasoe at jrglasoe@jrglasoe.com.

Web:  www.jrglasoe.com
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* These image samples are the result of a random search on the internet. These images are not mine unless noted otherwise. I intend no harm to the pet or artist in my assessment and study of the artist's style or qualifications. These are samples used for comparisons and contrasts in this discussion. 

JRGlasoe

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